Tag: management

How to Intrinsically Motivate Great Leadership With the Right Incentives

How to Intrinsically Motivate Great Leadership With the Right Incentives

Short-term incentives are an essential management tool serving the purpose of incentivizing people to achieve their short-term objectives. However, when people are too focused on these, short-term incentives can undermine leadership. Leadership is about finding ways to change the status quo, and this requires taking a moderate degree of calculated risk. To secure both their objectives and their short-term rewards, managers will minimize risk by following and incrementally improving the conventional means found within the status quo. This is exactly what managers are supposed to do. However, leadership is different than management. Where managers optimize the status quo, leaders change the status quo. To encourage leadership, don’t just reward people for achieving their objectives; reward them for taking the initiative to change the status quo. Since leadership initiatives come to fruition in the long term, providing stock options is a great means of encouraging it. Unfortunately, this aspect of these long-term incentives seems to have been forgotten by many businesses who use them primarily as “golden handcuffs” intended for employee retention. Thus, many managers receive these without providing the leadership that might contribute to the option’s upside.

Intuit Outside the Box

Intuit Outside the Box

As a leader, do you have difficulties thinking outside the box in brainstorming meetings? There are several reasons that this might be the case; however, in this article, I want to explain what is likely your most difficult challenge. This challenge has to do with your MBTITM personality type. Thinking outside the box is a creative process requiring the use of intuition, yet, few business managers have intuition as the dominant function of their personality type.

When faced with any goal, we naturally rely on our dominant functions, and for most leaders, that means using either introverted sensing or extraverted thinking. The problem is that both introverted sensing and extraverted thinking are convergent. Introverted sensors look to their paradigms for a solution, and extraverted thinkers try to linearly converge on a single correct answer.  But thinking outside the box is a divergent activity.

Rather than Thinking Outside the Box, the term Intuiting Outside the box is more aligned with divergently creating new ideas for problem-solving, innovation, and strategy. We can all use our creative intuition, and in fact, might subconsciously use it to defend your dominant thinking or sensing function. For example, dominant thinkers will tend to imagine ulterior motives to those who didn’t follow a logically linear path to a new idea, and sensors will dream-up all kinds of dangers in doing something new.

Learning to use their creative intuition is a skill that leaders can learn. However, the first step is to overcome any mistrust they have of intuition. They must keep in mind that evaluating new non-linear ideas still requires extraverted thinking to select the best ideas and to act as a safe-guard against bad ideas.